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U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is a unit of the United States Department of Labor. It is the principal fact-finding agency for the U.S. government in the broad field of labor economics and statistics and serves as a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System. The BLS is a governmental statistical agency that collects, processes, analyzes, and disseminates essential statistical data to the American public, the U.S. Congress, other Federal agencies, State and local governments, business, and labor representatives. The BLS also serves as a statistical resource to the Department of Labor, and conducts research into how much families need to earn to be able to enjoy a decent standard of living.

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    • June 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Olga Porozova
      Accessed On: 25 August, 2017
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      Time spent in detailed primary activities and percent of the civilian population age 15 and over engaging in each activity, averages per day by sex, annual averages
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    • March 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 June, 2017
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      The Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual States, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas; national occupational estimates for specific industries are also available.
    • December 2015
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 August, 2016
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      The Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) provides information on what workers do; the work environment; education, training, and other qualifications; pay; the job outlook; information on state and area data; similar occupations; and sources of additional information, for 329 occupational profiles covering about 83 percent of the jobs in the economy. Entry-level Education is the typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation. On-the-job Training is the additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation. Projected Number of New Jobs is the projected numeric change in employment from 2014 to 2024. Projected Growth Rate is the projected percent change in employment from 2014 to 2024. Median Pay is the wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment Statistics survey. In May 2015, the median annual wage for all workers was $36,200.
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    • September 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 September, 2017
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      Average consumer prices are calculated for household fuel, motor fuel, and food items from prices collected for the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Average prices are best used to measure the price level in a particular month, not to measure price change over time. It is more appropriate to use the CU or CW and its individual item indexes to measure price change.
    • May 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2017
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    • April 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 June, 2017
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    • December 2015
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 August, 2016
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      The source of the data is Employment Projections program (EP) that develops information about the labor market for the Nation as a whole for 10 years in the future: 2014 and projected 2024 employment and job openings statistics.
    • September 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2017
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      Establishments in the Manufacturing sector are often described as plants, factories, or mills and characteristically use power-driven machines and materials-handling equipment. However, establishments that transform materials or substances into new products by hand or in the worker's home and those engaged in selling to the general public products made on the same premises from which they are sold, such as bakeries, candy stores, and custom tailors, may also be included in this sector. Manufacturing establishments may process materials or may contract with other establishments to process their materials for them. Both types of establishments are included in manufacturing.
    • November 2016
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 December, 2016
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      National Employment Matrix - Industry Detailed occupations employed in each industry.
    • December 2015
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 June, 2017
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      National Employment Matrix - Occupation Detailed industries where each occupation is employed
    • September 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 September, 2017
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      The Retail Trade sector comprises establishments engaged in retailing merchandise, generally without transformation, and rendering services incidental to the sale of merchandise. The retailing process is the final step in the distribution of merchandise; retailers are, therefore, organized to sell merchandise in small quantities to the general public. This sector comprises two main types of retailers: store and non-store retailers. 1. Store retailers operate fixed point-of-sale locations, located and designed to attract a high volume of walk-in customers. In general, retail stores have extensive displays of merchandise and use mass-media advertising to attract customers. They typically sell merchandise to the general public for personal or household consumption, but some also serve business and institutional clients. In addition to retailing merchandise, some types of store retailers are also engaged in the provision of after-sales services, such as repair and installation. 2. Non-store retailers, like store retailers, are organized to serve the general public, but their retailing methods differ. The establishments of this sub-sector reach customers and market merchandise with methods, such as the broadcasting of "infomercials," the broadcasting and publishing of direct-response advertising, the publishing of paper and electronic catalogs, door-to-door solicitation, in-home demonstration, selling from portable stalls (street vendors, except food), and distribution through vending machines.
    • December 2015
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2016
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      Civilian labor force participation rates by sex, age, race, and ethnicityNote: "Percentage-point change" and  "Annual growth rate" indicates average ten years change and growth respectively. We have taken last year of the time intervals like  for the interval 1994–2004, considered 2004. Similarly for other time intervals 2004-14,considered 14 and 2014-24, considered 24.
    • December 2015
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2016
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      Employment by major industry sectorIndustries with the fastest growing and most rapidly declining wage and salary employmentNote: "Change" and "Compound Annual Rate of Change" indicates average ten years change and growth respectively. We have taken last year of the time intervals like for the interval 1994–2004, considered 2004. Similarly for other time intervals 2004-14,considered 14 and 2014-24, considered 24.
    • October 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2017
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      Dataset Updating using text file. https://download.bls.gov/pub/time.series/la/ https://download.bls.gov/pub/time.series/sm/
    • February 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 April, 2017
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      US Employment Situation of Veterans, 2016
    • October 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 October, 2017
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      Dataset contains US Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly data on changes in the US Total Non farm Payrolls and revisions of estimates since 1979. Non farm payroll employment is a compiled name for goods, construction and manufacturing companies in the US. It does not include farm workers, private household employees, or non-profit organization employees. It is an influential statistic and economic indicator released monthly by the United States Department of Labor as part of a comprehensive report on the state of the labor market. The NFP number is meant to represent the number of jobs added or lost in the economy over the last month, not including jobs relating to the farming industry. The Bureau of Labor Statistics releases preliminary data on the third Friday after the conclusion of the reference week, i.e., the week which includes the 12th of the month, at 8:30 a.m. Eastern Time; typically this date occurs on the first Friday of the month. Payroll refers to the payroll for full- and part-time workers who received pay for any part of the pay period that includes the 12th day of the month. The payroll is reported before deductions of any kind, such as those for old-age and unemployment insurance, group insurance, withholding tax, bonds, or union dues; also included is pay for overtime, holidays and vacation, sick leave paid directly by the firm, and commissions paid at least monthly. Bonuses (unless earned and paid regularly each pay period); other pay not earned in the pay period reported (such as retroactive pay); and the value of free rent, fuel, meals, or other payment in kind are excluded. Employee benefits (such as health and other types of insurance, contributions to retirement, and so forth, paid by the employer) also are excluded. The data comes Current Employment Statistics (CES) and have been revised by the BLS typically by one and two months after the preliminary release. First preliminary estimates of employment, hours, and earnings, based on less than the total sample, are published immediately following the reference month. Final (third) revised sample-based estimates are published 2 months later when nearly all the reports in the sample have been received. Revisions to CES over-the-month changes are calculated by comparing each month's second preliminary over-the-month change to the first preliminary over-the-month change, the final sample-based over-the month change with the second preliminary over-the-month change, and the final sample-based over-the-month change to the first preliminary over-the-month change. For futher information see the BLS Handbook of Methods and Technical Notes for the Current Employment Statistics Survey.  
    • October 2017
      Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 October, 2017
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      Producer Price Index - Current Commodity Series (WP), About 10,000 PPIs for individual products and groups of products are released each month. PPIs are available for the output of nearly all industries in the goods-producing sectors of the U.S. economy--mining, manufacturing, agriculture,fishing, and forestry--as well as natural gas, electricity, construction, and goods competitive with those made in the producing sectors, such as waste and scrap materials. The PPI program covers approximately 72 percent of the service sector's output, as measured by revenue reported in the 2007 Economic Census. Data includes industries in the following sectors: wholesale and retail trade; transportation and warehousing; information; finance and insurance; real estate brokering, rental, and leasing; professional, scientific, and technical services; administrative, support, and waste management services; health care and social assistance; and accommodation. To the extent possible, prices used in constructing the indexes are the actual revenue or net transaction prices producers receive for sales of their outputs. Scientific (probability) sampling techniques are used to select reporting establishments, products, and transactions for all types and volumes of output (not just volume-sellers). The commodity classification structure of the PPI organizes products by similarity of end use or material composition, regardless of whether the products are classified as primary or secondary in their industry of origin. This system is unique to the PPI and does not match any other standard coding structure. The commodity classification system is organized as a hierarchical structure that starts with major commodity groupings (2-digit level of aggregation). Each major commodity grouping includes (in descending order of aggregation) subgroups (3-digit level), product classes (4-digit level), sub product classes (5- and 6-digit level), item groupings (7-digit level), and individual items (8-, 9-, and 10-digit levels). Commodity-based FD-ID price indexes regroup commodities at the sub product class (six-digit) level, according to the class of buyer and the amount of physical processing or assembling the products have undergone. Commodity-based Inputs to Industries indexes regroup commodities to form indexes for the net input to industry production (excluding capital investment, labor, and imports). Summary Data Available: More than 4,000 commodity price indexes organized by product, service, and end use. Indexes by Final Demand-Intermediate Demand (FD-ID), Inputs to Industries, and by durability of Product (8 series) are also available, some back to 1947.
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